• June 8, 2017

    And so we come to the end…

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    Hello Everyone – Ive spent my life in books and words. Friends know that my mom used to tell the story of my coming home from school one day in First Grade, and announcing, “When I grow up, I’m going to be a book guy.” And so I have been. Always a book guy, whether as a writer, an editor, a collaborator, a publisher, or (for a couple decades now) an agent. I love books and I love words, and I’m happy that I’ve spent my life and made my living with them. Please forgive me if I’ve told this story too often.

    I started this blog more than a decade ago, when we were all discussing whether the new e-reader called “The Kindle” was going to work or not, and when CBA fiction was growing by leaps and bounds. I’d been let go as a publisher at Time-Warner, and decided I was going to head back into agenting, since it was one of the fews jobs that would allow a middle-aged guy with a very limited skill set to make a living. So I began the blog as a way to get my name out there a bit. It’s been great, I’ve talked with fabulous people, and I’ve loved being able to answer questions from writers. I always figured that my experiences (I made my living as a magazine editor, a collaborative writer, a book editor, an author, a book publisher, and an agent) gave me a rather unique perspective when it came to talking books and the book process — and I had enough experience with marketing and sales and business to at least point people in the right direction.

    For a few years, the blog just exploded. We had millions of people stop by to read, won some awards, had Writers Digest name us as one of the top websites for writers a few times. Then I

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  • June 5, 2017

    Ask the Agent: Why is everyone so upset?

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    This month I’m back to trying to get to all the questions people say they’d like to ask an agent, if they could just sit down with him or her for a few minutes and talk privately. In light of some of the notes Steve Oates, the VP of Marketing at Bethany House, shared on this blog last week, here are some questions that people have asked recently…

    So are the low costs of e-books costing authors money?

    Sure. (Expect to see a bunch of indie published authors tearing their hair out over this response, because they tend not to want to hear about economics, in my experience.) Okay, if a retailer sells a book for $20, the royalty paid to the author is higher than if the publishers sells it for $10. The average e-book is way down — many below $5, and often you’ll see a slug of books for 99 cents. That doesn’t leave much for an author. So earnings are down across the board, but they are more spread out among a wider group of authors — that makes it feel as though there’s more money being paid out. Economically, it’s not true. The overall sales numbers are fairly stable the past couple of years. So with all the low priced ebooks and mass market titles earning less per book, the overall income of authors is actually down.

    Saying that doesn’t make me negative on indie publishing, by the way, and certainly not on genre publishing. Anyone who knows me or has read the blog for any length of time knows I have long been a fan of indie publishing, and I’ve represented a ton of category fiction. The concern is with the low price point, which has lowered the earnings of authors — particularly established authors. The  argument is made that people want a deal, and low prices build readership by finding readers who will

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  • June 1, 2017

    Who ate my CBA fiction market? (a guest blog)

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    Once again, Steve Oates is the VP of Marketing for Bethany House Publishers, and he sent me a blog post as a follow-up to her previous post… 

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    When we set out two years ago to do a complete analysis of the Christian fiction market, we were pretty shocked at what we found. As the leader in the Christian fiction market for decades, we at Bethany House were amazed when we saw that a competitor had come out of nowhere in just 10 years and very quietly gained 40% market share in print units. It was a publisher who pretty much never appears on the Christian fiction bestseller lists, but clearly does an enormous volume.

    Know who I’m talking about? Harlequin, of course, doing business under the Love Inspired imprints, selling largely at Walmart, but also in other receptive outlets for mass-market sized books, mostly at $5.99. The market share numbers are not quite so daunting when you do them on a dollar basis, as they only get half as much share, but they are still the largest player in the arena.

    What does this mean for all of us in Christian fiction? More competition. Harlequin was a new (well… new for CBA), low-priced competitor, joining those at the bottom of the market offering free eBooks, or self-published books put out at low cost and with low prices, and publisher specials of older books, such as $5 print specials in stores and $.99 or $1.99 fiction specials in eBooks. That means if you are a customer who doesn’t have to get the latest and greatest new book, you can find lots of ways to read, often for free in eBooks, and almost never above $10 in print. At a minimum, I think this devalues the worth of our new, full-length novels, and, at worst, it satisfies demand for book entertainment so that some buyers completely disappear from the full-price market

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  • May 28, 2017

    Where Did All the Christian Fiction Buyers Go? (A Guest Blog)

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    Steve Oates is the VP of Marketing for Bethany House Publishers. Recently, after I had blogged about the significant changes we’ve seen in Christian fiction, he contacted me with some thoughts. I invited him to send me a blog post to use — and here is his initial response…

    Hardly a week goes by without another announcement from someone that they are getting out of the Christian fiction market, or another retailer is going out of business or shutting down. So, is it time for all of us working in Christian fiction to quit and find something else to do?

    Before we all leave town, let’s check on the data and see what we can actually know about this market. I recently did the second year of a study of what is selling in all markets under the Christian and Amish fiction categories as reported by Bookscan (these are the data folks behind the ECPA bestseller lists). What I found is surprising: While there is a lot of upheaval in what is selling, what is remarkable is that both unit and dollar sales of fiction actually rose slightly from 2016 to 2017. And we are not talking digital here, this is just print, and just in the trade paperback and hardcover formats.

    So if sales are growing rather than declining, why so much pain in the market? The pain is real, and there is consolidation taking place. What we are seeing is a migration in the market out of the “C” level books that is going into the “B” level books. By this I mean a movement out of the bottom tier (based on sales of less than 7,500 copies) in to the next tier — let’s say books that sell in the 7,500 to 15,000 range. The shrinking shelf space has harmed stocking of these lower-potential books, stores simply can’t put them all out there, and their marketing

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  • May 25, 2017

    Ask the Agent: Indie publishing, ebooks, movie rights, et al.

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    So if you could sit down at Starbucks with a literary agent, and ask him any question you wanted, what would you ask? I’m taking a few months to let writers ask those questions they’ve always wanted to talk over with an agent…

    Does being a self-published author with several books help or hurt your chances of getting an agent to read something?

    If the books are well written and have a good track record of sales, that will improve your chances. If the books are poorly done, or if you can’t show that you’ve sold many copies (or worse, the Amazon numbers reveal you haven’t sold many books), it will hurt your chances. I guess that’s not a surprise to you. But understand that indie-pubbed books don’t disqualify you from landing an agent, nor does having a printed book you did on CreateSpace help your cause very much. An agent is going to be looking for a great idea, expressed through great writing, from an author with a great platform who has a strong track record of sales.

    What advice would you give a first-time author? I’ve been trying to network, but not sure what else to do.

    Know your audience. Take charge of your marketing. Have goals. Talk with someone who really knows how to market. Go to everyone you know. Do everything the publisher asks you to do. Research where your likely readers are online — maybe make a list of the top 100 sites your potential readers are gathering — then find ways to get onto those sites and get your name and book title in front of those readers. Learn to talk about your story in a way that’s interesting, and find venues to do that. Solicit reviews. Use the Amazon tools. Figure out some strategies you are comfortable with, and which you think will be effective, then do them. Don’t expect miracles. Don’t give

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  • May 14, 2017

    Ask the Agent: Platforms, Publications, and Mother’s Day

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    As I write this, it’s Mother’s Day, and I happen to have been born on Mother’s Day oh those many decades ago. I’m home, my mom is long gone, and I realized writers have been sending in a LOT of questions, so I thought I should take a Sunday afternoon and try to do a bunch of them, in order to catch up on the pile a bit. Again, all this month we’re inviting authors to send the question they’ve always wanted to ask a literary agent, if only they could be face to face. Here are some that have come in recently…

    I know many agents are looking for an author to have a big “platform.” How do you define a platform. And what does a big platform look like to you?

    A platform is a number. Do you speak? How many people do you speak to over the course of a year? You write a column? What’s your readership? You’re on radio? What’s your listenership? You blog? How many hits do you get? You do a column? How many people read your work? You belong to organizations? How many people are you connected to? All of those are numbers — just add up the numbers, and you’ll know how big your platform is. The bigger the number, more people you have the potential to reach out to, the happier a publisher is going to be. More important is how many people you actually have some sort of relationship with — that is, how many of those folks do you speak to or consider an acquaintance? Can you suggest what percentage might actually purchase a book? A small publisher may be happy with a platform of ten to twenty thousand. A medium sized published may be looking for a platform that is at least forty to sixty thousand. A large publisher may not be all that interested if your

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  • May 7, 2017

    Ask the the Agent: The questions you’ve always wanted to ask

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    All last month I was inviting writers to send in their questions — If you could sit down and be face-to-face with a literary agent, what would you ask? I’d like to continue down that path for another month. Here are some of the questions that have come in…

    At a big writing conference last summer, I noticed that most agents and editors now insist on seeing a “completed manuscript.” I have a manuscript I’ve rewritten several times — you even once took a look and suggested I work with an editor to improve it. So what is the definition of a “completed manuscript”?

    I have two answers for you… First, when an editor says they’re only looking at completed manuscripts, that means they aren’t going to seriously consider a proposal and sample chapters. They insist on an author showing them a finished manuscript, so that they lower their risk (no worries about missed deadlines, or the story going off the rails, etc). That’s the industry norm for first-time novelists these days. But my second answer is that “completed” to an agent can also means your manuscript has been revised, rewritten, and is ready to show to a publisher. I frequently see novels that have promise, but they need more work, so I’ll suggest changes to the manuscript, or I’ll encourage the author to work with a writing coach, or I’ll just give the author the names and emails of half a dozen editors and encourage them to get some professional assistance. Does that help?

    I know you represent a lot of thrillers. Is it possible to have a female protagonist in a thriller? Does she have to be teamed with a strong male in order to survive?

    Sure, it’s possible. In fact, there are some publishers right now that are looking for strong female leads in some contemporary thriller novels. Examples of books with strong female leads

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  • April 30, 2017

    If you could ask any question of a literary agent…

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    I’ve been taking the month of April and asking readers to send in their specific questions of literary agent. So if you could have lunch with an agent, sit down face to face and talk, what would you ask? Here are some of the questions that have come in…

    Recently a publisher stated that he thinks an author ought to plow some of their advance back into marketing — which upset me, since it seems wrong-headed to expect authors to bear the financial burden of book promotion. Why pick on the weakest financial link in the chain? Am I hopelessly naive? Or is that the new normal?

    I saw that interview, and I’m of two minds. First, I agree that every author needs to throw himself or herself into their own book. Let’s face it, NOBODY has more at stake in a book than the author. Nobody knows the story better. Nobody has spent more time on it. Nobody is counting on the the success more than the author. So I understand a publisher trying to encourage an author to go “all in” on marketing. But second, I think it’s crazy for a publisher, who is hopeful for the book to do well but not completely tied to its success (because the publisher has other books to sell), to say, “The author ought to take his advance check and use that money to pay an outside publicist.” Um, maybe there are times where that’s exactly what needs to happen. But it comes across as out of touch and unrealistic, since most authors are trying to live on advances. I mean, I could just as easily say to a publisher, “If you want to be more successful, you need to reinvest your paycheck into training your people.” So no, this is not the new normal. I do think publishers are expecting more out of authors when it comes to marketing these

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  • April 23, 2017

    If you could sit down and have a cup of coffee with an agent…

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    Okay, so I’ve been asking people to send in questions — What is it you’ve always wanted to talk with a literary agent about? If you could sit down over coffee and just have a conversation, what would you ask? Here are some questions that came in…

    Do you recommend self-publishing with your authors?

    Absolutely. I think authors today have to think about doing a variety of projects through a number of venues. That could mean they are working with traditional publishers, non-traditional publishers, niche publishers, and self-publishing some projects. I’m a big supporter of what I consider the “hybrid” author.

    What are the challenges of agenting in today’s publishing climate?

    Well, agenting (like writing) has never been easy. You have to understand the market, have relationships with the editors, know what each house is looking for, keep current on things like trends and publishing contracts. Most importantly, in today’s market agents are called upon to be part of the marketing effort — something that we didn’t used to do much of. But in terms of the recent challenges, I would say advances are down, and slots are limited, making a debut for an author harder than ever. There are more books available, so it’s tougher to help an author get noticed. And there’s also been a bit of an anti-agent movement going on among the indie-publishing crowd, which I think is fueled by people who really do not understand the publishing business. I have faced that a bit over the past couple of years, and it’s been interesting — people who really don’t know the industry, but are absolutely certain they know that an agent is unnecessary. I’d be lying if I said that wasn’t a challenge we’re all facing today.

    I’ve heard you mention a couple times that you have some reservations about Amazon — can you explain to me in simple terms what the problem is?

    Sure.

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  • April 15, 2017

    Ask the Agent: What have you always wanted to ask?

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    I’m spending the month answering questions authors say they would ask if they could sit down and have a conversation with me. I’ll be doing this the entire month of April, and I’m trying to get to all the questions that get sent in.

    Can I query an agent if I’ve posted one or more chapters of my book online?

    It depends on the agent, but with MacGregor Literary (and with many other agencies) YES we would look at a book that has been posted online. That’s one of the things that has changed over the past couple of years.

    When an agent receives a standard commission, does it all stay with the agent or is it split with the agency?

    If the agent works for a medium-sized agency, then yes, that commission is going to be split. Part of it will be paid to the agent, and part will remain with the agency. If the agent works for a large agency where he or she is paid a salary, the commission goes to the agency, but a bonus will probably be paid at the end of the year, depending on the size of the deal. Of course, at a small agency, the agent is probably keeping the bulk of the commission.

    How might I find the most appropriate agents to query? The usual advice seems to be to read agent blogs and websites, read the Guide to Literary Agents, and comb the acknowledgements in books by comparable writers. I’ve done a good deal of that. The problem: By vocation I’m an academic. I write non-fiction for a non-academic readership. Most people in my line of work write for other scholars and don’t have agents, and I haven’t been finding people like me on agency lists of authors — though my search has not been exhaustive. Like most of my colleagues, I sold my first book without an agent. Now

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